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Take Action: Tell CA Governor Brown to Veto SB 778


Bud-Sweepstakes

In stunning denial of the public health and safety threats of encouraging more alcohol consumption, the California State Legislature has passed SB 778 - a bill to allow sweepstakes and contests promoting alcohol sales in the state. ”We are deeply disturbed by this election year gift to Big Alcohol,” stated Alcohol Justice Public Affairs Director Michael Scippa. “We are calling upon Governor Brown to veto this irresponsible measure because overturning the state’s existing ban on alcohol-related contests will lead to increased over-consumption and increased public health and safety costs.” Click here totake action now: Tell Governor Brown to veto SB 778! 


 

            

Wine Institute Gets $60 Million in Federal Subsidies for Marketing, Travel

A new government oversight report recently released by U.S. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) opened the lid on the federally-funded Market Access Program, revealing ways that more than $2 billion in taxpayer dollars are used each year to subsidize advertising & promotion costs of some of the most profitable American corporations & trade groups doing business overseas.
 
One of the largest single recipients of these federal dollars is the Wine Institute - a major trade association for the California wine industry, which already soaks in $17.9 billion in annual sales. 
The Wine Institute received nearly $7 million in taxpayer dollars from the Market Access Program in 2012, and raked in more than $60 million over the past decade.
 
Just what have American tax dollars funded for the Wine Institute? A myriad of travel expenses for wine industry representatives including wine festivals and tastings in London, Denmark, and Dublin, and “educational" wine tastings in Mexico. The report calls for an end to "bounty of waste, loot, and spoils plundered from taxpayers."


Click here to read the full Treasure MAP report.

L.A. Public Safety Committee Asks for Input on Alcohol Ad Ban

The L.A. Public Safety Committee recently requested input regarding the effectiveness of banning alcohol ads on public property, and how such restrictions could be put into place in the city. Such a ban would benefit the youth of L.A. and reduce alcohol-related public safety costs by reducing the amount of alcohol ads kids see, which would impact how much they drink and how early they start.  By continuing to allow alcohol producers to place ads on public property, the city contributes to underage drinking and related harm. It's time to tell the L.A. City Council Public Safety Committee that restricting alcohol ads on public property makes a difference. Click here to take action.